Collaborating with ‘the industry’ as a PhD student

Earlier last year I was given the chance to work together with the CEO of the start-up Yoop on a ‘submission of evidence’ for an all-party parliamentary group (APPG). This is a group in the UK Parliament composed of members of parliament from all political parties. This APPG, in particular, sought to provide recommendations for the House of Commons on critical literacy and fake news and their impact on younger generations.

This was a great experience and one of those (few, lucky) serendipitous occasions, of meeting someone at the right place, at the right time: shortly before submissions were due!

In the end, we were cited several times in the published report of recommendations, presented to the House of Commons, which can be found here. This is an achievement I am rather proud of!

I have written more about this collaboration and my thoughts for the UK Data Service Data Impact Blog, as part of a collaborative series with my friend and colleague Claudia Zucca, if you’d like to read more!

Esmeralda

Impact – 1

It’s been a while since I’ve posted, but I’m still here! I’ve recently written a blog post for the UK Data Service, part 1 of a series, which can be found here.  I think ‘impact’ is a very interesting concept, one that guides where most of the funding goes in academia, yet which is difficult if not impossible to accurately measure. In some ways, this measurement is not fair, because it creates ‘winners’ and ‘losers’. However, life isn’t fair, and for the sake of supporting (potentially) impactful research, the use of measurement can be regarded as a necessary evil.

Lessons learned: being a ‘digital scholar’

When I attend PhD training sessions, courses and events, we are always reminded that a successful PhD candidacy (at least somewhat, and perhaps even largely) depends on making an impact. In brief, being impactful = PhD success.

Knowing this, I have been reading about how to be an ‘open scholar’ or ‘digital scholar’. This is because I believe that (junior) academics rely on digital platforms for sharing knowledge and information. One of the books I’ve been reading is Martin Weller’s The Digital Scholar (2011)

Continue reading “Lessons learned: being a ‘digital scholar’”

Social Media and Social Cohesion (Seminar)

A little bit over two weeks ago I attended a week-long seminar – sponsored by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW, name dating to 1851 but founded by Louis Bonaparte in 1808) and the Hendrik Muller Fonds – about social media and social cohesion in Amsterdam, in the beautiful Trippenhuis (a Dutch heritage site and former museum, once housing Rembrandt’s ‘The Nightwatch’).  Continue reading “Social Media and Social Cohesion (Seminar)”